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Breakthrough in Cancer Research


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11/1/2015
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Researchers have made a discovery in cancer treatment that could prolong patients’ lives.

Professor Michael Boyer, chief clinical officer at Sydney’s cutting-edge cancer centre The Chris O’Brien Lifehouse, reportedly discovered a new treatment for cancer that could give hope to patients and their families.

The findings were reported in News Local. The report suggests that the new cancer treatment would be an alternative to chemotherapy and radiation. This new medication has the potential to dramatically prolong and improve the lives of cancer patients.

The first group of drugs is called Tyrosine-Kinase Inhibitors also known as TKIs. These drugs treat the mutation that gave rise to the growth and spread of the disease.  

Cell growth is problematic in cancer because cancer cells tend to receive altered messages or the messages to grow or die may be missing. As a result, the cells grow uncontrollably and divide a lot. When a normal cell divides, the ends of its chromosomes become shorter and eventually the cell dies and is being replaced.

Cancer cells cheat the system and retain their long chromosomes by adding bits back on, therefore the cancer cells survive and multiply, it lives forever.

This gene mutation gives cancer cells an advantage over other cells and eventually abnormal cells acquire mutations in more genes causing uncontrolled growth.

TKIs are not cures for cancer, but can help control cancer growth.

According to researchers immunotherapies can be considered a modern treatment option. Unfortunately, some cancers are invincible and escape detection.

Researchers urge the public to remain hopeful. Over the past 25 years the change of being alive after five years of cancer has increased from 46 to 67%. The Future of cancer care is rapidly evolving.

Read the source article here.

 



Category: Misdiagnosis and Failure to Diagnose


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